Past Issues

When Pigs Fly: For the airlines of Portugal, Italy, Greece and Spain, the yoke of Europe’s long slump is lifting

It’s not a very flattering term, and it wasn’t intended to be. The four economies of southern Europe—Portugal, Italy, Greece and Spain, came to be known collectively by the unfortunate acronym formed by the first letters of their names: the...

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Getting Undomesticated: It’s all international for All Nippon as Japan’s largest airline seeks refuge abroad

A domestic-heavy airline, bombarded with a sudden explosion of low-cost shorthaul competition, seeks refuge abroad. If that sounds like a description of how U.S. airlines began to improve their fortunes a decade ago—well, it is. But now, halfway around the...

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Running Up the Score: Already having a good decade, U.S. airlines keep getting better

Doug Parker, now CEO of American, and as such head of the world’s largest airline, doesn’t for a moment believe that the cyclical nature of the airline business is a thing of the past. But, he argues, the days of...

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The Squeeze Play: One of the most important cabin innovations of all involves giving passengers less, not more

If IATA is right, the airlines of the world will once again generate more money than they spend in 2014, which would mark the industry’s fifth straight year of profitability. One reason why: The Squeeze Play. The last five years...

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The Qantas Quagmire: It’s shaping up to be an awful year for the flying kangaroo

When it comes to making money, Qantas, as a rule, doesn’t dazzle. But nor does it disappoint. Unlike any of the North American legacy carriers, or those in Europe or Japan or anywhere else in the rich world, Qantas managed...

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Close the Door: U.S. carriers, together with their unions, are playing the protectionist card

Keep the doors closed, Air Canada’s chief Calin Rovinescu implied during a recent speech in Vancouver. “Let me be clear,” he said. “The Gulf carriers are seeking to scoop or divert connection traffic—transit passengers that are already traveling to or...

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Leading Lufthansa: Airline Weekly speaks with the outgoing CEO of (still) the world’s largest airline group

It is still, by total company revenues, the largest airline group in the world—even if now (following the American-US Airways merger) by “only” a billion dollars or so annually. And because a majority of the Lufthansa Group’s business comes from...

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Capacity Audacity in Asia: Carriers across the region, led by LCCs, have their feet firmly on the growth pedal

And you thought you’ve got problems? Just be thankful you’re not Chokchai Panyayong. The new acting president of Thai Airways, whose predecessor resigned Dec. 20, starts his job with a list of challenges that even the chiefs of Air India...

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Looking Back, Looking Ahead: The top 10 developments in 2013—and what to watch in 2014

Overall, 2013 was the global airline industry’s best year since 2010. There was modest economic growth. Passenger traffic grew strongly. Fuel prices were relatively stable. And cost discipline prevailed. But that’s oversimplifying. In reality, much of the overall success came...

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Deep in the Heart: When it comes to air service, there’s no messing with Texas

In the state capitol building of Texas, on the floor directly under the rotunda (which stands taller than the U.S. capitol), are the seals of six nations whose flags have flown over Texas at various times. The U.S. seal is...

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Domestic Disturbance: Chinese airlines are going abroad, because things at home are not what they used to be

Currency, cargo, and capacity woes are hammering Asia’s airlines. And slowing economies and incursions by both Gulf carriers and LCCs alike don’t help. But China, on the other hand, is different. Or is it? The mainland Chinese market is indeed...

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Getting Hammered: For European longhaul airlines, pressure from Gulf carriers continues

European airlines watched with horror last week as Gulf carriers ordered another 400 widebody aircraft, auguring huge competitive capacity increases. Worse yet, all this demand for new planes is pushing up aircraft ownership costs for airlines everywhere—even Ryanair, which normally...

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